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About this collection

Milton Caniff, who was born and raised in Ohio and spent his early career years in Columbus, was a seminal cartoonist of the 20th century best known for "Terry and the Pirates" and "Steve Canyon," popular comic strips from the mid-1930s through the late 1950s. Caniff, known as the "Rembrandt of the Comic Strip," is remembered for his accurate background research, excellent writing, attention to detail and innovative use of graphic techniques.

 

Milton Caniff is one of the most honored cartoonists in history. His comic strips "Terry and the Pirates," "Male Call," and "Steve Canyon" were immensely popular. By 1947, "Steve Canyon" had an estimated daily readership of 30 million people worldwide. However, Caniff was caught in the Generation Gap of the 1960s and lost audience, largely because his cartoons reflected militarism, sexism, violence, and racism. Although he moved to New York early in his career, Caniff always stayed true to his Ohio roots. In 1954, Ohio awarded him a Career Medal as a "distinguished son of Ohio."

 

This collection was photographed in preparation for "Spotlight on Milton Caniff," an exhibit which highlights the cartoonist's life during what would have been his centennial year, on display at the Ohio Historical Center from Oct. 25, 2007 through March 2, 2009.

 
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